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Famous Attractions in the area

Windansea Beach in La Jolla

Children's Pool La Jolla

La Jolla Village, Prospect Street


Sea World San Diego

Restaurants in La Jolla

Children's Pool La Jolla


La Jolla Shores Beach

San Diego Zoo

La Jolla Village Square


Weddings In La Jolla

La Jolla Cove Ecological Reserve

Mount Soledad Park


Torrey Pines State Park

University Town Center Mall

Windansea Beach La Jolla

Down the hill, past La Jolla's ritzy homes, hotels, boutiques and restaurants, lies Windansea Beach, flanked by surfers and sunbathers on hot summer days. With its sandstone cliffs, sandy beach, and incredible surf breaks, Windansea has been a popular surfing haunt as far back as the 1940s and a gathering spot of the Windansea Surf Club since the 1960s. The shack on the beach, built by surfers during World War II, is now a San Diego Historic site. The south end of the beach is fairly rocky and the north is sandier, good for a nice walk along the water's edge. You can also enjoy a picnic on the bluff next to the beach and take in the awe-inspiring views of the Pacific.

Windansea Parking & Restrooms

There are no public restrooms at Windansea Beach. Lifeguards are stationed during the summer and during some weekends in the fall and spring. There is no wheelchair access to the beach. Separate swim and surf zones are set up at Windansea. You can park on the street or try the tiny single lot near the beach.

Directions To Windansea Beach

Windansea is located around 6800 Neptune Place. From the north, follow I-5 south to the Genesee Avenue exit and head west. Turn left on Torrey Pines Road and follow it into downtown La Jolla. Turn left on Girard Avenue and then right on Pearl Street. Next, turn left onto La Jolla Boulevard. Make a right on Nautilus Street. From the south, follow I-5 north to the Ardath Road exit. Ardath Road becomes Torrey Pines Road. Turn left from Torrey Pines Road onto Girard Avenue. Make a right on Pearl Street and then turn left onto La Jolla Boulevard. Turn right on Nautilus Street.

Insider Tips

Windansea is one of the most scenic beaches in Southern California — a great place for a romantic stroll at sunset. Parents should use caution with small children playing at Windansea; the surf often breaks directly on the shore with surprising power. As with most beaches in San Diego, arriving early will guarantee easy parking and more privacy.

The Children’s Pool

The Children’s Pool, or the “Casa” as locals have called it, is a tiny cove protected by a concrete breakwater.

A sea wall was built in 1931. It protected the beach from waves making it a favorite spot for divers and swimmers. Local philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps paid for the sea wall project in order to create a Children's Pool, a place where children could play and swim. Ms.Scripps donated the completed project to the City of San Diego.

What became a safe-haven for children also became a natural attraction to Harbor seals and sea lions. Seals come here to rest, sunbathe and even have pups, as the sand has filled in most of the area inside the wall. Now visitors can enjoy the added bonus of an ongoing marine mammal show courtesy of the seals that play in and around the shore or at Seal Rock.

Seal pup births were observed at Children's Pool for the first time in 1999. As of late 2009 about 200 harbor seals use the beach regularly. The seals have become a popular tourist attraction. The seal-watching feature attracts over 80,000 annual visitors.

A controversy developed over the purpose of the beach. Some wanted it to be treated as a marine mammal sanctuary, while others wanted to preserve it for recreational swimming. Currently swimming is allowed but not recommended due to the high bacterial count caused by "a seal excrement overload".

Various lawsuits, appeals, and state laws have been filed over these issues.

The city of San Diego put up a rope barrier to discourage people from approaching the marine mammals during the pupping season, from mid-December to mid-May, so that pregnant seals can rest and give birth on the beach without humans coming too close and frightening them. Some seals on the beach are acclimated to people and may play with swimmers and divers. However, the city lifeguard service warns that "Like all wild animals, seals and sea lions are unpredictable and can become aggressive quickly. They have sharp teeth and may bite"

Please note that to local San Diegan's this is a very emotional issue. The San Diego Police Department says that police have responded to "numerous calls for service at Children's Pool involving alleged incidents of threatened assault and intimidation" between seal advocates, swimmers and divers, and that in some cases citations have been issued or people taken into custody. A La Jolla man was indicted for sending e-mailed death threats to a seal advocate and to the Animal Protection and Rescue League.

Despite its controversy, Children’s Pool is still a beautiful area.  The seals inhabit the beach year-round.  You can walk out on the sea wall where you are surrounded by the ocean to watch the seals or to observe the tide pools that teem with interesting sea creatures.

The waves crash into the wall where you can experience all the sights, sounds, and the smell of the fresh ocean breeze.  Children's Pool boasts some of the most strikingly beautiful sunsets you'll ever see. Couples find it romantic to watch the sun set in the evening as it gradually creates bursts of infinite color as it slowly disappears beyond the ocean horizon.

La Jolla Cove

For thousands of years, back to the time of the Indian nomads, man has walked along the shores of La Jolla. He has gathered from the sea, played in the surf, fished from the shore and watched the sun set in the far west. Surrounded by the brooding "Alligator Head" (a rock arch formation), the ocean and the sandy terraces covered with tide pools, the La Jolla Cove is this area's most historic spot. Being identified as a park in the 1887 protected the land around the Cove; it was then that this location was appropriately called "La Jolla Park." On October 18, 1927, it was dedicated as the Ellen Browning Scripps Park in recognition of Miss Scripps' 91st birthday and for her many contributions to La Jolla.

There is an abundance of marine life at the Cove, mostly because it is part of the La Jolla Park Ecological Reserve. Hunting of any kind is not permitted. The marine biodiversity is partially sustained by the nutrient-rich water, which is the result of upwelling from the nearby La Jolla Submarine Canyons. A number of harbor seals frequent the area and will occasionally join you on your dive, swim or snorkel. Sometimes the seals will come in close to take a peek at you, other times they just zoom by you, seemingly to prove who the better swimmer is.  La Jolla cove is filled with feathery strands of kelp, grasses, and anemones. There are octopi and lobster and powder blue sea stars, eels, and bat rays. Brilliantly colored garibaldi, sheephead, and schools of blacksmith frequent this area as well. It is another world, timeless, quiet, fragile, and beautiful.

The San Diego City Council recognized this significant natural resource in 1970 when six thousand submerged acres were declared an underwater park. A year later, 514 of these acres were included in a "look but don't touch" ecological reserve. No fishing or collecting of marine invertebrates, (even taking dead specimens or seashells) is allowed. All sea animals in this area are protected by law. Because the water is protected, surfboards, boogie boards and other floatation devices are not permitted and this rule is carefully enforced by the lifeguards.

Just a short swim away to the right on the coast is "Sunny Jim Cave." The only cave of the seven La Jolla Caves that is also accessible from a nearby store, which charges a nominal fee to go down a staircase leading to the cave. There are 145 steps that take you down a steep descent onto a wooden platform that may be wet due to high surf. It was named by Frank Baum who wrote Wizard of Oz.  From inside looking out the opening resembles the character Sunny Jim, mascot for British Force Wheat cereal in the 1920’s. The cave was carved by over 200,000 years of ocean waves.  It took two years to carve the tunnel from the street to the deck. The man made tunnel was completed in 1903.

You can take some amazing pictures around the Cove. Because of its extraordinary beauty, La Jolla Cove is one of the most photographed beaches in Southern California.

The La Jolla Cove is home to the annual La Jolla Cove Rough Water swim. This is one of the oldest ocean swims in the world.

La Jolla Cove has some of the clearest water of all San Diego beaches. You will find it ideal for scuba diving and snorkeling. The gentle lapping waves of La Jolla Cove also make for an enjoyable day of sunbathing, picnicking, or reading a book.

La Jolla Shores Beach

La Jolla Shores Beach is a nearly a mile long. Near its center is Kellogg Park. Here, you will find grassy park areas with tables for picnics. By day the main beach is a busy swimming and sunbathing area popular among families. At night it's alive with the glow of beach fires.

The south end of the beach stretches towards La Jolla Cove’s calm waters. This attracts kayakers and divers who like to explore the underwater ecological reserve.

Kayaking is a very popular activity at La Jolla Shores. Small boats and kayaks can be launched directly into the sea from the end of Avenida De La Playa, the south end of Kellogg Park.

La Jolla Shores is the most popular location for scuba diving in San Diego and attracts both beginner and experienced divers. The south part of the coast here and is used as training grounds by scores of scuba diving students. The biggest attraction for diving in La Jolla is the San Diego-La Jolla Underwater Park Ecological Reserve, a 533 acre underwater marine preserve. Also, just 100 yards off-shore, divers will find La Jolla Canyon, which drops to 600 feet deep and Scripps Canyon, which drops to 1,000 feet deep. In addition to abundant sea life, this area is home to harmless leopard sharks during the late summer, an occasional California Blue Whale during the winter.

It also attracts ocean swimmers who train for swimming endurance races around the world. The one-way distance from La Jolla Cove to the La Jolla Shores boat ramp where you will primarily see kayakers is 2/3rds of a mile while the one-way distance from La Jolla Cove to Scripps Pier is 1.7 miles. The most recognized ocean swimming competition is the La Jolla Rough Water Swim. Started in 1916, the event takes place in late September. Over 2,000 participants swim either a 1-mile or 3-mile course.

The north end of the beach stretches towards Scripps Pier and Torrey Pines. This is a good area to go for a walk along the beach. The north end of the beach, better known as Scripps for the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and its landmark pier is favored by intermediate surfers and body boarders. Scripps Pier is not open to the public. If there is low tide, you can walk past the pier. From this point forward, you will be walking below tall beach cliffs so take precaution because they can collapse on occasion. About 600yd past the pier, you will come across an area of large volcanic rock from the Miocene era. This 11 million year old volcanic rock is referred to as Dike rock. The stretch of beach closer to Scripps Pier provides sunbathers very few crowds and a lot more space.

Those who want to play in the waves will need to stay to the south side of the beach while those who want to surf will need to stay to the north side. The life guards will have signs posted on where you can go. Lifeguards are on duty year-round. Generally, you will see them from 9AM – Dusk. La Jolla Shores is a popular spot for surfing classes and local surf club competitions, especially for kids. On Avenida de la Playa there is a number of great surf shops where you can take surf lessons.

Water temperatures are usually 60F during winter and 70F during summer. If that is too cold for you, there are wetsuits available for rent from local shops on Avenida de la Playa which is located a couple blocks to the south-east. Avenida de la Playa is also home to a few European style cafés and restaurants and businesses offering beach equipment rentals, including kayaks, dive equipment, and boogie boards.

While most visitors will spend their time looking at the waves, some will face the opposite direction and enjoy looking at the surrounding hillside full of multi-million dollar homes. The tallest hill you see towards the southeast is Mount Soledad.

At the north end of Kellogg Park is a children’s playground. Next to it is a map of the underwater ecological reserve. It is laid out over the ground with descriptions of the different sea animals found off-shore. Those who want to learn more about the local marine habitat should visit the nearby Birch Aquarium, which hosts field trips to the waters off La Jolla Shores.

The La Jolla Beach & Tennis Club comprises the southernmost end of La Jolla Shores Beach. The club is private property but the beach itself is public. Beyond that, the sand abruptly ends in front of the Marine Room Restaurant, where harmless Leopard Sharks often congregate in the shallows, offering snorkelers an exhilarating encounter. The Marine Room restaurant is famous for its high-tide dinners during the summer and high-tide breakfasts during the winter when waves come crashing up against the windows. After the Beach and Tennis Club, there are a few homes you will pass before the beach ends at La Jolla Cove.

La Jolla Village

La Jolla Downtown, also known as La Jolla Village, is located on the La Jolla peninsula, a familiar landmark, which can be seen from Oceanside and beyond on a clear day. Prospect Street is the main drag, with upscale jewelry and boutique shops, art galleries, fine dining, cafes, exquisite hotels, and clubs. Downtown combines a down to earth coastal feel with a cosmopolitan, southern European charm, unlike anywhere else along the coast.

Walking Through La Jolla

La Jolla Downtown is ideal for walking. You can start from almost anywhere, and easily become overwhelmed by all the enticing stores and surrounding beauty. The history of the town is evident in its older surrounding neighborhoods, small cottages converted into shops, old sidewalks and older retail area along Girard and Wall Streets.

Prospect Street between Herschel Ave and Girard Ave is considered the center of the La Jolla Downtown Village, where you will find a concentration of shops, and easy access to La Jolla Cove and Ellen Browning Scripps Park via S. Coast Blvd.

Many more stores run along Girard up from Prospect Ave to Silverado Street in the more historical part of town. They include drug stores, banks, offices, restaurants, boutique, jewelry, and clothing stores, art galleries, and more, separated in places by public parking. This street has a much different feeling than Prospect Ave.

Mount Soledad Park

Mount Soledad Park provides a bird’s eye view, at 822 feet above sea level, of the entire San Diego metropolitan area and the Pacific Ocean. On a crystal clear day (often after a rain storm or during Santa Ana Winds), you can clearly see homes in Mexico and the snowcapped mountains in Los Angeles (Mount San Antonio also known as Old Baldy), San Bernardino (San Gorgonio Mountain), and Riverside (Mount San Jacinto) Counties. All of these peaks reach over 10,000 feet. Even on a day with very low clouds or fog, Mt. Soledad can provide quite a treat when it sits above the banks of fog that fill in the surrounding canyons.

Looking to the north, you will see up to Camp Pendleton, the Marine Corps base that separates San Diego and Orange Counties. To the west, you will have a beautiful look down to the palm tree lined beach at La Jolla Shores and the Pacific Ocean. To the south, you will see downtown San Diego, Coronado, and Mexico. Finally, to the east, you will see Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, where the movie Top Gun was filmed, and the San Diego Mountains. Also, when you look to the east, look past MCAS Miramar for a ridge line the runs north-south just before the mountain range. This ridge line used to be the sea cliffs one million years ago. Everything you see in between used to be a part of the ocean floor.

At the top of Mt Soledad is a cross that can be seen throughout San Diego. It’s a large concrete Latin cross, first built in 1913, and rebuilt twice. After it was challenged in court during the late 1980s, it was designated a Korean War memorial. It became the center of a controversy, known around the world, over the display of religious symbols on government property. Beginning in 1989 and ongoing to the present, the Mt. Soledad Cross had been involved in a continuous litigation regarding its legal status. According to the interpretation of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and No Preference Clause of the California Constitution by the opponents of the cross, it is illegal to display a religious symbol, such as a Christian cross, on public land, as it demonstrates preference to a specific religion and thus violates the separation of church and state.  It was ruled unconstitutional in January 2011. CNN says the case will "almost certainly" be appealed to the Supreme Court.

Surrounding the cross is a memorial to military veterans. You will see plaques commemorating the efforts of individual veterans. There are over 3,000 black granite plaques placed on the walls of the Memorial honoring veterans, living and deceased, from the Revolutionary War to the current conflicts in the Middle East. The plaques on the walls tell you the stories of scores of men and women from Presidents, Medal of Honor recipients, Admirals, Generals, Hollywood celebrities and thousands of others with names that are unfamiliar, but who proudly served our country to help protect the freedoms we enjoy as Americans. A number of special events take place throughout the year, especially on Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

Because of the variety of long steady climbs, light traffic on most routes, and great views, Mount Soledad is a popular cycling destination and area. There are numerous routes ranging from the relatively gradual on the southern slopes to the very steep and short on the north side.

Mount Soledad also holds the last home lived in by Dr. Seuss. His widow, Audrey Geisel, still resides atop Mount Soledad in a lavish home that includes “The Cat in the Hat” and an observation tower that is referred to as the “Seuss House” by the locals.

To get the most out of your visit we suggest you park your car and enjoy the spectacular view. You will find a handful of parking spots along the circle that takes you around the Memorial and back to the main street. If you are unable to find a parking spot here, you will find a much larger gravel parking area closer to the entrance of the park.

Sea World San Diego

Come celebrate the wonders of the sea at SeaWorld San Diego. Experience the amazing Shamu show, and thrilling rides like Journey To Atlantis, Shipwreck Rapids and Wild Arctic. Dive into the world of sea turtles at Turtle Reef, an attraction featuring a 300,000-gallon aquarium with up to 60 threatened sea turtles, an interactive game that teaches kids about the threats turtles face in the wild, a map that tracks rehabilitated turtles and an exciting ride called Riptide Rescue. Don't miss the Pets Rule! show and the hilarious antics of Clyde and Seamore's sea lion and otter show. Feed and touch dolphins, and get up-close to beluga whales, polar bears, sharks and penguins. Discover where the sea meets the sky with "Blue Horizons," SeaWorld's dolphin spectacular. Create memories to last a lifetime at SeaWorld.

Address:
500 SeaWorld Dr
San Diego, CA 92109
800.25.SHAMU (Toll-Free)
800.380.3203
Hours of Operation:
Hours vary and are extended seasonally; visit Seaworld San Diego website for hours, show schedules and park information.

San Diego Zoo

An urban paradise for all ages, the San Diego Zoo is a must-see in Southern California. Spend the day monkeying around in our tropical oasis as you visit amazing habitats for animals such as gorillas, tigers, sun bears, flamingos, mandrills, polar bears, birds of paradise, giant tortoises, leopards and more. Take a Panda Trek to visit the giant pandas and other animals that share their bamboo forest habitat. Go back in time through Elephant Odyssey to discover what animals used to roam Southern California and to see a herd of Asian elephants. Enjoy a guided tour on a double-decker bus or an aerial view from Skyfari, dine in the peaceful surroundings of Albert’s Restaurant, and see animals up close in the Children's Zoo. The festive, lively atmosphere makes the San Diego Zoo a great place for family fun and gathering friends. Discover the wonders of wildlife with animal encounters, interactive experiences, and keeper presentations. A leader in animal care and conservation, the San Diego Zoo is at the heart of the San Diego experience.

Address:
2920 Zoo Dr
San Diego, CA 92101
800.407.9534 (Toll-Free)
619.718.3000

Torrey Pines State Park

Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve is located within San Diego city limits and yet remains one of the wildest stretches of land on our Southern California coast! Because of the efforts and foresight of the people in this area, 2000 acres of land are as they were before San Diego was developed -with the chaparral plant community, the rare and elegant Torrey pine trees, miles of unspoiled beaches, and a lagoon that is vital to migrating seabirds. One can imagine what California must have looked like to the early settlers, or to the Spanish explorers, or even to the first California residents here, the Kumeyaay people.
There are 8 miles of trails, a visitor center, and guided nature walks on weekends and holidays.

Torrey Pines is visited by travelers from all over the world and by local residents who come daily to rest at the stunning overlooks, walk a peaceful trail, or exercise in a clean, beautiful environment. Spend some time at this web site, and then come spend some time at beautiful Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve. Special care has been taken to preserve it and keep it for now and forever.

Closing Time: The Reserve closes at approximately sunset.  Gates now close at 8:00 PM.  ALL vehicles must leave by the closing time each day.

University Town Center

Imagine open-air plazas, beautiful gardens, an exciting range of shops, a high quality Dining Terrace, and a fresh outdoor look reflecting the unique character of the La Jolla lifestyle. Expect airy pedestrian-friendly walkways, fun activities for the family, relaxing seating areas, eco amenities, green elements and an array of diverse new retail.
Westfield UTC resides within the heart of University City, next to the lovely community of La Jolla. Just 15 minutes from Downtown San Diego and 20 minutes from the San Diego International Airport, the center is conveniently located on the corner of La Jolla Village Drive and Genesee Avenue between the I-5 and I-805 Freeways.

Address:
4545 La Jolla Village Drive, Suite E-25,
San Diego, CA 92122-1212
Phone: (858) 546-8858

La Jolla Village Square

Come discover an exciting collection of retail, dining, and entertainment choices. From casual dining, grocery and specialty foods, to fashions for the entire family, home accessories, and a variety of specialty stores, you'll find something for everyone at La Jolla Village Square.

Address:
8657 Villa La Jolla Dr.
La Jolla, CA 92037
Center Hours:
Monday-Saturday 10am-9pm; Sunday Noon-6pm

Windansea Beach La Jolla

Down the hill, past La Jolla's ritzy homes, hotels, boutiques and restaurants, lies Windansea Beach, flanked by surfers and sunbathers on hot summer days. With its sandstone cliffs, sandy beach, and incredible surf breaks, Windansea has been a popular surfing haunt as far back as the 1940s and a gathering spot of the Windansea Surf Club since the 1960s. The shack on the beach, built by surfers during World War II, is now a San Diego Historic site. The south end of the beach is fairly rocky and the north is sandier, good for a nice walk along the water's edge. You can also enjoy a picnic on the bluff next to the beach and take in the awe-inspiring views of the Pacific.

Windansea Parking & Restrooms

There are no public restrooms at Windansea Beach. Lifeguards are stationed during the summer and during some weekends in the fall and spring. There is no wheelchair access to the beach. Separate swim and surf zones are set up at Windansea. You can park on the street or try the tiny single lot near the beach.

Directions To Windansea Beach

Windansea is located around 6800 Neptune Place. From the north, follow I-5 south to the Genesee Avenue exit and head west. Turn left on Torrey Pines Road and follow it into downtown La Jolla. Turn left on Girard Avenue and then right on Pearl Street. Next, turn left onto La Jolla Boulevard. Make a right on Nautilus Street. From the south, follow I-5 north to the Ardath Road exit. Ardath Road becomes Torrey Pines Road. Turn left from Torrey Pines Road onto Girard Avenue. Make a right on Pearl Street and then turn left onto La Jolla Boulevard. Turn right on Nautilus Street.

Insider Tips

Windansea is one of the most scenic beaches in Southern California — a great place for a romantic stroll at sunset. Parents should use caution with small children playing at Windansea; the surf often breaks directly on the shore with surprising power. As with most beaches in San Diego, arriving early will guarantee easy parking and more privacy.

Weddings In La Jolla

Typical La Jolla weather is sunshine, all year long, so no wonder La Jolla is one of the top romantic wedding destinations in America. With its beautiful beach sceneries La Jolla has become a dream come true beach wedding location.

Let your guests experience excellent hospitality and the service at La Jolla Beach Travelodge. Enjoy comfortable rooms and special wedding guest rates. Please call us directly for the best prices and availability. Do not hesitate to contact us if you are looking for more information on wedding ceremony and reception places in La Jolla.

Toll-Free:  (800) 454-4361 Local Number:  (858) 454-0716
Fax Number: (858) 454-1075
Address: 6750 La Jolla Blvd La Jolla CA 92037
E-mail: info@lajollatravelodge.com


Visti La Jolla

La Jolla Beach Travelodge is located only one block from the fabulous Wind-n-Sea Beach and only one mile from downtown La Jolla with all its fine restaurants and shopping. La Jolla Beach Travelodge is a short seven mile drive to the famous Sea World and only nine miles from Old Town San Diego. As you can see we are in the heart of all the La Jolla attractions.